Appellations

Amarone della Valpolicella

Amarone della Valpolicella is a type of red wine that is produced in the Valpolicella region of northeastern Italy. The wine is made from a blend of grape varieties, including Corvina, Rondinella, and Molinara, and is characterized by its rich, full-bodied flavor and long aging potential.

The production process for Amarone della Valpolicella is unique among Italian wines. The grapes are harvested later than usual, in October or November, and are then left to dry on straw mats or in well-ventilated rooms for several months. This process, known as "appassimento," concentrates the sugars and flavors in the grapes, resulting in a wine with a higher alcohol content and more complex flavors.

After the drying process is complete, the grapes are crushed and the juice is fermented for a period of several weeks. The wine is then aged for a minimum of three years in oak barrels, during which time it develops its characteristic flavors and aromas.

Amarone della Valpolicella is known for its deep ruby red color and complex flavors, which can include notes of dried fruit, spices, and chocolate. It is a full-bodied wine with high tannins and a long finish, and it pairs well with a variety of dishes, including red meat, game, and mature cheeses.

The history of Amarone della Valpolicella dates back to the 16th century, when it was first mentioned in the writings of a local priest. However, it was not until the 1950s and 60s that the wine gained widespread recognition, and it was granted the DOCG (Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita) classification in 1990. Today, Amarone della Valpolicella is one of Italy's most highly regarded and sought-after wines, and it is produced by a number of wineries in the Valpolicella region.

In addition to Amarone della Valpolicella, the Valpolicella region is also home to a number of other notable wines, including Valpolicella Classico, Valpolicella Ripasso, and Recioto della Valpolicella. Valpolicella Classico is a lighter, more approachable wine made from the same grape varieties as Amarone, and it is aged for a shorter period of time. Valpolicella Ripasso is a wine that is made by adding partially fermented Amarone must to Valpolicella Classico, resulting in a wine with a fuller body and more complex flavors. Recioto della Valpolicella is a sweet wine made from partially dried grapes that are fermented for a shorter period of time, resulting in a wine with a high sugar content and a rich, luscious flavor.

The Valpolicella region is located in the province of Verona, in the Veneto region of northeastern Italy. It is known for its rolling hills, vineyards, and charming medieval villages, and it is a popular destination for wine tourists. The region is home to a number of wineries that produce a range of wines, including red, white, and sparkling wines, and it is also known for its food, including cured meats, cheeses, and pasta dishes.

In conclusion, Amarone della Valpolicella is a complex and highly regarded red wine that is produced in the Valpolicella region of northeastern Italy. Its unique production process and blend of grape varieties result in a wine with a deep ruby red color, rich, full-bodied flavor, and long aging potential. It pairs well with a variety of dishes and is enjoyed by wine lovers around the world.

What are the exact requirements for the production of Amarone della Valpolicella DOCG?

Amarone della Valpolicella DOCG is a full-bodied red wine produced in the Valpolicella region of northeastern Italy. To be labeled as Amarone della Valpolicella DOCG, the wine must meet the following requirements:

  • It must be produced exclusively from Corvina, Rondinella, and Molinara grapes grown in the Valpolicella region.

  • The grapes must be partially dried before fermentation, a process known as "appassimento." The grapes are traditionally left to dry on straw mats or in well-ventilated rooms for several weeks or months before being crushed and fermented.

  • The wine must be aged for a minimum of two years, with at least one year in oak barrels.

  • The wine must have a minimum alcohol content of 14% by volume.

  • The wine must meet strict quality standards set by the Consorzio Tutela Vini Valpolicella, the organization responsible for regulating the production of Amarone della Valpolicella DOCG.

Amarone della Valpolicella DOCG is known for its rich, full-bodied flavors and aromas, which are typically characterized by notes of dark fruit, spices, and oak. The wine is typically enjoyed with hearty, full-flavored foods such as red meats, game, and aged cheeses. It is also often enjoyed on its own as a sipping wine.

Valpolicella region

Valpolicella is a wine-producing region located in the province of Verona, in the Veneto region of northeastern Italy. The name Valpolicella comes from the Latin "valley of many cellars," a reference to the numerous cellars and wineries that dot the region.

Valpolicella has a long and rich history of winemaking that dates back to ancient Roman times. The region's wines were highly prized by the Romans, who recognized the region's unique terroir and the quality of its grapes. In fact, the Roman poet Martial wrote about the region's wines in his epigrams, praising their delicious flavors and aromas.

During the Middle Ages, the Valpolicella region became known for its high-quality wines, which were often served at the tables of royalty and nobility. The region's wines were particularly popular in the courts of the Holy Roman Empire, and Valpolicella wines were often given as gifts to European monarchs and dignitaries.

In the centuries that followed, the Valpolicella region continued to thrive as a center of winemaking. The region's wines became increasingly popular, and the demand for Valpolicella wines continued to grow. In the 19th century, the region's wines were exported to the United States and other countries, and Valpolicella wines became known around the world for their rich, fruity flavors and smooth tannins.

Today, the Valpolicella region is home to a number of wineries and vineyards, many of which offer tours and tastings to visitors. The region is also home to a number of small, family-run wineries, which produce high-quality, handcrafted wines using traditional methods.

The Valpolicella region is known for producing some of Italy's most highly prized wines, including Valpolicella, Amarone, and Recioto. Valpolicella is a light red wine made from a blend of Corvina, Rondinella, and Molinara grapes. Amarone is a full-bodied red wine made from partially dried grapes, while Recioto is a sweet red wine made from dried grapes.

Valpolicella wines are typically aged in oak barrels, which give them their distinctive flavors and aromas. The region's wines are also known for their long aging potential, and many Valpolicella wines can be aged for decades.

In addition to its famous wines, the Valpolicella region is also known for its stunning natural beauty. The region is home to rolling hills, olive groves, and vineyards, as well as a number of charming towns and villages. Visitors to the region can explore its rich history and culture, as well as enjoy outdoor activities such as hiking, cycling, and golf.

The Valpolicella region is located in the heart of the Veneto region, which is home to a number of other famous wine-producing regions, including Soave and Prosecco. The region is also home to the city of Verona, which is known for its stunning architecture, rich cultural history, and beautiful setting on the banks of the Adige River.

Overall, the Valpolicella region is a must-visit destination for wine lovers and anyone interested in exploring Italy's rich culinary and cultural heritage. With its beautiful landscapes, delicious wines, and charming towns and villages, it is a truly special place.